John Meed

John Meed is a singer-songwriter based in Cambridge described by R2 Rock’n’Reel as: ‘a consummate storyteller’ whose songs are ‘thoughtful and thought provoking.’

‘John Meed inhabits his subject matter, digging deep into the emotional content to find a surprising angle in a way that has seen him compared, rightly, to Leonard Cohen, Al Stewart and Jaques Brel.’ Shindig

‘A breath of fresh, mellow, unsophisticated and unpretentious folk air.’ Rock Society

‘Pavilion Parade said it all really – who said political songwriting was dead?’ Eric Bogle

You can download the first single from John’s forthcoming album here

Recent Posts

Nine Wells

I continue my ecological survey of the fields south of Addenbrookes Hospital around the Nine Wells nature reserve.The field on the hospital side of the cycle path is wonderfully wild at the moment – this morning I heard 3 corn buntings there (right) and saw 2 (possibly 3) pairs of reed buntings. A yellowhammer was also singing and several skylarks.

The field on the other side of the cycle path had been earmarked by South Cambridgeshire District Council for further development. However, the conservatives suffered a shock defeat in the recent local elections. The liberal democrats, who now have overall control of the council, had campaigned vigorously against the proposed development. Let’s hope they now throw it out – I am trying to clarify the position. In case they need reminding, you can write to local councillors.

My 2017 survey of the area – which you can download below – showed that the area remains extremely valuable for farmland birds of high conservation concern, with exceptional numbers of grey partridge in the autumn, as well as good numbers of skylark, linnet, yellowhammer and corn bunting.3P

‘The square km south of Addenbrookes has this year supported a grey partridge population of at least 11 spring pairs/km2 and 85 birds/km2 in autumn. The arable farms typical of Cambridgeshire support between 0 and 5 pairs/km2 and 0–20 birds/km2 in the autumn.’

Corn buntings also did particularly well last year, with 8 pairs. This is an important population – there are just 11,000 birds in the UK and its recent extinction in Ireland risks being repeated in large parts of Britain if its breeding sites are not protected. The RSPB’s nearby Hope Farm had 2 pairs in 2016 in 1.8km2.

In addition, the site supports a thriving population of water voles, both in the start of Hobsons Brook, and in the ditch that runs alongside the cycle path.

You can download a copy of my report for 2017 here.

Nine_wells_Survey_report_2017

My reports for 2016 are here:

Nine_wells_Survey_report_2016

Grey_partridge_2016

My reports for 2015 are here:

Survey_report_for_TL4654_2015

Grey_partridge_of_Nine_Wells

6 thoughts on “Nine Wells

  1. PLEASE! Leave some green space for our benefit and for wild life. It is outrageous how the green belt is being destroyed.

  2. Pingback: Stand up for Nine Wells

  3. Timely and thorough reports, thank you John. The field proposed for removal from the green belt has the most dense population of the fast declining red list grey partridge in October.

    Lets hope that those who care about the Ninewells ecosystem comment on the South Cambs website in large numbers, leaving their names and addresses so they are counted.

    • Enough is enough ! If any more S Cambridge habitat is lost we risk losing the whole ecosystem.

      Rw camValley Forum and Hobson’s trustee.

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